Automated shooting

Note that each photo is a link to the flickr stream, except the remote release which is a link to Amazon. 🙂

On Sunday morning I saw a Great Spotted Woodpecker from our bedroom window. Of course, by the time I got downstaires it had gone. I had things to be doing so I set my camera up in the conservatory with the big lens on a tripod and the wireless remote release.

My wireless remote is very similar to this one.

I put two legs of the tripod on the window ledge and one leg on the arm of the sofa. I then zoomed in and focused on an appropriate part of the feeder, switched it to manual focus, and set the interval timer on the remote release. I set it to take one shot every minute for 120 shots and then went to make a coffee. After the coffee I got on with the various things I needed to do.

The camera was happily firing away every minute. Whenever I looked out of the window there was nothing on the feeder so I had no idea if I would finish up with anything worth keeping.

Later on I took everything down and then headed off for a walk along the river and through Denso Marston Nature Reserve. I met several people and one of their first questions was “Have you seen it?” After finding out that they meant the Black Bellied Dipper I tried not to look smug (honest) when I said “Yes. I have seen it. I took some photos of it in October last year.” I then directed them further down the river where I could just pick out the dipper on the other side. I know the photo is a bit (a lot?) dark but lightening it makes a lot of noise on it. Clicking on the image will take you to my flickr photostream.

Black Bellied Dipper, Denso Marston Nature Reserve

After spending a while along the river without a great deal of bird activity I decided to start heading back. However, after watching a Kingfisher fly up river I stopped to take some photos of the river itself. I thought the reflection of the sky in the river looked nice. I took this photo using a Hoya 58mm Circular Polarizing Filter that helps add some contrast to the clouds and changes the reflection on the water.

River Aire, Denso Marston Nature Reserve

Anyway, to cut the story short, I finally got to see the photos taken by the camera in the morning. There were a few blurred photos of a female blackbird on the feeder. As I was going through them – next – delete – next – delete – I almost deleted the one shown below, which would have been a shame because it made it all worthwhile.

Great Spotted Woodpecker, our garden

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.